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  • INJECTION WELLHEAD

    Captured CO2 gas is transported to the CO2 storage site. The injection wellhead is the entry point for the CO2 to access the storage basin. The wellhead is the “control center” for the CO2 storage, and is the location that is securely capped once injection activities have ceased.

  • WATER SOURCES

    Nearly 40% of freshwater in the US is sourced from underground water sources. The CO2 injection wells are engineered to securely pass CO2 beyond these groundwater sources, and ultimately store the CO2 thousands of feet below the groundwater. Each site is safely permitted in a bespoke, purpose-design fashion.

  • CLASS VI WELL

    The CO2 travels from the wellhead to the storage basin via a well. Class VI (“six”) wells are designated by the US EPA to securely inject and store CO2 underground. They are one of several well types, but generally call for the most rigorous monitoring, characterization, and safety requirements of all injection wells.

  • GEOLOGIC STRATA

    The Earth’s subsurface is made up of dozens of unique layers of rock – varying significantly around the world. The US is fortunate to have widespread geology that permits large-scale storage of CO2 underground. For each injection site, diligent characterization of the subsurface geology is completed to inform the execution of carbon storage.

  • IMPERMEABLE SEAL

    The seal is a layer of non-porous rock that traps the CO2 permanently in place once injected. The seal sits directly above the storage basin, and can be thought of as a geophysical “lid” for the CO2. The impermeable seal, combined with wellhead capping, create the conditions for permanent storage of CO2.

  • STORAGE BASIN

    The storage basin is the layer of porous rock where the CO2 is stored underground. These pores “soak” up the CO2, and globally can store 10s of 1000s of billions of tonnes of CO2. Each storage site has monitoring systems and computer modeling to understand exactly how the CO2 is behaving after injection.

Captured CO2 gas is transported to the CO2 storage site. The injection wellhead is the entry point for the CO2 to access the storage basin. The wellhead is the “control center” for the CO2 storage, and is the location that is securely capped once injection activities have ceased.

Nearly 40% of freshwater in the US is sourced from underground water sources. The CO2 injection wells are engineered to securely pass CO2 beyond these groundwater sources, and ultimately store the CO2 thousands of feet below the groundwater. Each site is safely permitted in a bespoke, purpose-design fashion.

The CO2 travels from the wellhead to the storage basin via a well. Class VI (“six”) wells are designated by the US EPA to securely inject and store CO2 underground. They are one of several well types, but generally call for the most rigorous monitoring, characterization, and safety requirements of all injection wells.

The Earth’s subsurface is made up of dozens of unique layers of rock – varying significantly around the world. The US is fortunate to have widespread geology that permits large-scale storage of CO2 underground. For each injection site, diligent characterization of the subsurface geology is completed to inform the execution of carbon storage.

The seal is a layer of non-porous rock that traps the CO2 permanently in place once injected. The seal sits directly above the storage basin, and can be thought of as a geophysical “lid” for the CO2. The impermeable seal, combined with wellhead capping, create the conditions for permanent storage of CO2.

The storage basin is the layer of porous rock where the CO2 is stored underground. These pores “soak” up the CO2, and globally can store 10s of 1000s of billions of tonnes of CO2. Each storage site has monitoring systems and computer modeling to understand exactly how the CO2 is behaving after injection.